www.websyte.com/subject Web Knowledgebase

Over 46,000 free articles designed to give you useful information on how to save money, make money, improve your health, happiness, and relationships.

The Retirement-Savings Vs. College-Savings Dilemma

Google
Web www.websyte.com/subject
Select a Topic

Addiction
Adsense
Adwords
Affiliate
Article
Auction
Auto And Trucks
Auto Insurance
Baby
Bankruptcy
Bathroom
Blog
Business
Business And Finance
Children
Computers And Internet
Cooking
Credit
Dating
Decorating
Depression
Diabetes
Diet
Dog
Dog Training
Domain
Dvd Reviews
Ebay
Education
Email Marketing
Family
Fishing
Food And Drink
Foot
Furniture
Gadgets And Gizmos
Garden
Golf
Guitar
Hair
Health
History
Home
Home Business
Home Mortgage
Home Refinance
Home Schooling
How To
Insurance
Internet Marketing
Investing
Ipod
Job
Kids And Teens
Kitchen
Learning
Legal
Make Money
Marketing
Marriage
Massage
Maternity
Menopause
Mortgage
Online Business
Parenting
Party Planning
Pets And Animals
Photography
Real Estate
Refinance
Relationships
Remodeling
Retirement
Rss
Sales
Save
Self Improvement And Motivation
Shopping
Site Promotion
Speaking
Stocks
Success
Sudoku
Tips
Travel
Travel And Leisure
Voip
Wealth
Web Design And Development
Website
Wedding
Women
Work At Home
Writing

By Francis Kier

Before a child is born, every parent considers (even if briefly) the cost of raising a child and to put them through college. And the question about saving money that youíll consider at some point is: how do I evaluate whether I should be saving for my own retirement or saving for the kidsí college?

The obvious answer is to save for both. But few young parents have the earning power and lifestyle discipline to have extra money left over at the end of the month. It simply isnít practical for most families or young parents to do so.

When it comes to paying for college, there are many resources to tap. The most common sources are student loans, grants, scholarships, tax credits, work-study, employer assistance, or financial aid from states/federal agencies/community organizations. If that isnít enough, the student could choose a school with cheaper tuition, work part-time, or work full-time and postpone entering school to save up more money.

There is always a way to fund a college education or trade school training (even an expensive one). But there is no way to finance a retirement. None. (You can apply for a reverse mortgage to spend the equity that youíve built up in your home, but that is not a sustainable solution for most retirees). What do you think is going to happen when the baby-boomers start receiving social security checks in 2014. Do you think it will be more likely that social security benefits will go up or go down? Are the social security taxes that people pay more likely to go up or go down? The underlying answer is that you need to personally save money for your own retirement; nobody is going to automatically write you a big check to spend however you want just because you donít want to work anymore.

Iíve explained some of the details but the concise answer to the title question to this article is: always save for your retirement first, because no one is going to do for it for you. Save for college later when you are earning more money, and already have a great start on your retirement accounts. There are many ways to pay for a college education, and it seems there are more every few years. But as no one knows the future, your kids may not even have an interest or need for college based on their particular situation. In the meantime, over those same 18 years, you could have set aside a lot of money for your retirement.

About The Author: Francis Kier has an MBA in finance and shares his two decades of experience with investing and personal finance. More of his articles are available at investing.real-solution-center.com.