www.websyte.com/subject Web Knowledgebase

Over 46,000 free articles designed to give you useful information on how to save money, make money, improve your health, happiness, and relationships.

A Garden To Attract Hummingbirds

Google
Web www.websyte.com/subject
Select a Topic

Addiction
Adsense
Adwords
Affiliate
Article
Auction
Auto And Trucks
Auto Insurance
Baby
Bankruptcy
Bathroom
Blog
Business
Business And Finance
Children
Computers And Internet
Cooking
Credit
Dating
Decorating
Depression
Diabetes
Diet
Dog
Dog Training
Domain
Dvd Reviews
Ebay
Education
Email Marketing
Family
Fishing
Food And Drink
Foot
Furniture
Gadgets And Gizmos
Garden
General Interest
Golf
Guitar
Hair
Health
History
Home
Home Business
Home Mortgage
Home Refinance
Home Schooling
How To
Insurance
Internet Marketing
Investing
Ipod
Job
Kids And Teens
Kitchen
Learning
Legal
Make Money
Marketing
Marriage
Massage
Maternity
Menopause
Mortgage
Online Business
Parenting
Party Planning
Pets And Animals
Photography
Real Estate
Refinance
Relationships
Remodeling
Retirement
Rss
Sales
Save
Self Improvement And Motivation
Shopping
Site Promotion
Speaking
Stocks
Success
Sudoku
Tips
Travel
Travel And Leisure
Voip
Wealth
Web Design And Development
Website
Wedding
Women
Work At Home
Writing

By John Sanderson

“Mommy, come see! There are fairies in the garden!”

And so they might have been to the eyes of a five year old who grew up on tales of pixies, elves and fairies. The magical visitor this time, though, was a ruby-throated hummingbird. Hummingbirds have a unique ability to hover in one place by rapidly fluttering their tiny wings which may truly have made them the ‘fairies’ that many people saw hovering around brightly colored flowers.

It’s not difficult to create a garden that will attract hummingbirds, but if you’d like to build a habitat in which they will happily nest and live throughout the northern summer, you need to provide them with more than a sugar-water feeder and a plant or two. An active hummingbird garden doesn’t need to be large, but it will have all of the following key ingredients to attract and keep the attention of nature’s fairies.

Choose nectar producing plants that bloom at different times throughout the spring, summer and autumn.

Flowers are, of course, the key ingredient in attracting hummingbirds to your garden. The tiny birds feed on nectar that is produced by flowers, and seem particularly attracted to plants with trumpet or tubular bright red and orange flowers. Among their particular favorites, though, are rhododendrons, azaleas and rose of Sharon bushes, so the red trumpet isn’t a hard and fast rule. For northern gardens that attract the ruby-throated hummingbird, choose from the list of plants below, making sure that you choose plants that flower at different times during the blooming season to provide food for them throughout the spring, summer and fall.

Spring Bloomers Azaleas, rhododendrons and rose of Sharon bushes make a great ‘background’ for hummingbird gardens. They bloom early in the spring and continue blooming through the early summer. Pink and bright red varieties are favored, but hummingbirds love ALL rose of Sharon varieties.

Summer Bloomers Bleeding hearts and red mountain columbine bloom in the early summer, as do petunias, morning glories, trumpet vines, trumpet honeysuckle, and impatiens, all of which attract hummingbirds. An expanse of shade-dappled impatiens is a powerful attraction for hummingbirds, who are ‘sight’ hunters, finding their feeding grounds by sight.

Autumn Bloomers Butterfly bush, day lilies, garden phlox, bee-balm and impatiens all will keep hummingbirds returning through the autumn and attract late migrators.

Provide a source of water in the hummingbird garden. Unlike larger birds, hummingbirds will seldom take advantage of a bird bath or bowl of water. Instead, they relish cool mists. A garden hose with a misting attachment or a small fountain that can be adjusted to a fine mist will keep them happy.

Create vertical space for hummingbirds to perch and nest in your garden.

Hummingbirds need shelter from predators and small branches for perching and resting (yes, yes, they do perch sometimes!). By choosing a few taller bushes or trees, you can provide both.

A few strategically placed hummingbird feeders will offer an easy treat in your hummingbird garden.

There are dozens of commercially designed hummingbird feeders designed to be attractive to the little wanderers. Choose feeders with bright red accents, and a capacity for about 8 ounces of sugar water. Rather than using one large feeder, place 2-4 of them around your garden, out of sight of each other if possible. Hummingbirds are notoriously territorial. By providing several ‘private’ feeding stations, you’ll increase the number of hummingbirds that you attract.

About The Author: This article courtesy of www.garden-furniture-guide.com